State Individual Income Tax Rates and Brackets for 2016

Feb 22, 2016 | Publisher: edocr | Category: Civic & Government |  | Collection: Policy Reports | Views: 4 | Likes: 1

FISCAL FACT The Tax Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-partisan, non-profit research institution founded in 1937 to educate the public on tax policy. Based in Washington, DC, our economic and policy analysis is guided by the principles of sound tax policy: simplicity, neutrality, transparency, and stability. ©2016 Tax Foundation Distributed under Creative Commons CC-BY-NC 4.0 Editor, Melodie Bowler Designer, Dan Carvajal Tax Foundation 1325 G Street, NW, Suite 950 Washington, DC 20005 202.464.6200 taxfoundation.org State Individual Income Tax Rates and Brackets for 2016 By Nicole Kaeding Economist Feb. 2016 No. 500 Key Findings · Individual income taxes are a major source of state government revenue, accounting for 27 percent of state tax collections. · Forty-three states levy individual income taxes. Forty-one tax wage and salary income, while two states—New Hampshire and Tennessee—exclusively tax dividend and interest income. Seven states levy no income tax at all. · Of those states taxing wages, eight have single-rate tax structures, with one rate applying to all taxable income. Conversely, 33 states levy graduated-rate income taxes, with the number of brackets varying widely by state. · States’ approaches to income taxes vary in other details as well. Some states double their single-bracket widths for married filers to avoid the “marriage penalty.” Some states index tax brackets, exemptions, and deductions for inflation; many others do not. Some states tie their standard deductions and personal exemptions to the federal tax code, while others set their own or offer none at all. 2 Individual income taxes are a major source of state government revenue, accounting for 27 percent of state tax collections.1 Their prominence in public policy considerations is further enhanced by the fact that individuals are directly responsible for filing their income taxes, in contrast to the indirect payment of sales and excise taxes. To many taxpayers, the personal income tax is practically synonymous with their own tax burdens. Forty-three states levy individual income taxes. Forty-one tax wage and salary income, while two states—New Hampshire and Tennessee—exclusively tax dividend and interest income. Seven states levy no income tax at all. Of those states taxing wages, eight have single-rate tax structures, with one rate applying to all taxable income. Conversely, 33 states levy graduated-rate income taxes, with the number of brackets varying widely by state. Kansas, for example, imposes a two-bracket income tax system. At the other end of the spectrum, two states—California, and Missouri-- have 10 tax brackets. Top marginal rates range from Pennsylvania’s 3.07 percent to California’s 13.3 percent. In some states, a large number of brackets are clustered within a narrow income band; Missouri taxpayers reach the state’s tenth and highest bracket at $9,001 in annual income. In other states, the top marginal rate kicks in at $500,000 (New Jersey) or even $1,000,000 (California, if one counts the state’s “millionaire’s tax” surcharge). States’ approaches to income taxes vary in other details as well. Some states double their single-bracket widths for married filers to avoid the “marriage penalty.” Some states index tax brackets, exemptions, and deductions for inflation; many others do not. Some states tie their standard deductions and personal exemptions to the federal tax code, while others set their own or offer none at all. In the following table, we provide the most up-to-date data available on state individual income tax rates, brackets, standard deductions, and personal exemptions for both single and joint filers. 1 “State and Local Government Finance, Fiscal Year 2013.” Census Bureau. 2015. http://www.census.gov/govs/local/. 3 Notable Individual Income Tax Changes in 2016 Several states changed key features of their individual income tax codes between 2015 and 2016. These changes include: · Arkansas lowered its top marginal rate from 7 percent to 6.9 percent on income over $35,100. Also, it adopted a new tax schedule for individuals earning between $21,000 and $75,000 in income. The state now has three tax schedules, with differing rates, depending on income.2 · Temporary tax increases expired in Hawaii. The three top rate brackets were eliminated, and the top marginal rate fell from 11 percent to 8.25 percent.3 · Maine lowered tax rates and added a third tax bracket. Rates were cut from 6.5 and 7.95 percent to 5.8, 6.75, and 7.15 percent.4 · Massachusetts’s rate fell from 5.15 percent to 5.1 percent.5 · Ohio’s tax rates decreased with the top marginal rate falling from 5.333 to 4.997 percent.6 2 Malm, Liz. “Arkansas Lawmakers Enact (Complicated) Middle Class Tax Cut.” Tax Foundation. March 9, 2015. http://taxfoundation. org/blog/arkansas-lawmakers-enact-complicated-middle-class-tax-cut. 3 Yamachika, Tom. “Year End Tax Planning Tips.” Tax Foundation of Hawaii. November 23, 2015. http://www.tfhawaii.org/wordpress/ blog/2015/11/year-end-tax-planning-tips/. 4 Mistler, Steve. “After Long, Fierce Fight, Maine Gets a Budget and Avoids a Shutdown.” Portland Press Herald. June 30, 2015. http:// www.pressherald.com/2015/06/30/house-overrides-lepage-budget-veto/. 5 “Massachusetts Tax Rates.” Massachusetts Department of Revenue. 2016. http://www.mass.gov/dor/all-taxes/tax-rate-table.html. 6 Tax Rates, Ohio Code, 57(2016), §5747.02(3). VA 5.75% NC* 5.75% SC 7.0% GA 6.0% FL AL 5.0% MS 5.0% TN** 6.0% KY 6.0% OH 4.997% IN* 3.3% IL* 3.75% MO 6.0% AR 6.9% LA 6.0% IA 8.98% MN 9.85% WI 7.65% MI* 4.25% PA* 3.07% NY 8.82% ME 7.15% TX OK 5.0% KS 4.6% NE 6.84% SD ND 2.9% MT 6.9% WY CO* 4.63% NM 4.9% AZ 4.54% UT 5.0% NV ID 7.4% OR 9.9% WA CA 13.3% AK HI 8.25% WV 6.5% 5.1% MA* 5.99% RI 6.99% CT 8.97% NJ 6.6% DE 5.75% MD 8.95% DC 8.95% VT 5.0% NH** How High Are Income Tax Rates in Your State? Top State Marginal Individual Income Tax Rates, 2016 TAX FOUNDATION Note: (*) State has a flat income tax. (**) State also only taxes interest and dividends income. Map shows top marginal rates: the maximum statutory rate in each state. It is not an effective marginal tax rate, which would include the effects of phase-outs of various tax preferences. Local income taxes are not included. Source: State tax forms and instructions. Top State Marginal Individual Income Tax Rate Lower Higher 4 State Individual Income Tax Rates and Brackets for 2016 Single Filer Married Filing Jointly Standard Deduction Personal Exemption State Rates Brackets Rates Brackets Single Couple Single Couple Dependent Ala. 2.00% > $0 2.00% > $0 $2,500 $7,500 $1,500 $3,000 $1,000 (b, f) 4.00% > $500 4.00% > $1,000 5.00% > $3,000 5.00% > $6,000 Alaska none none n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Ariz. 2.59% > $0 2.59% > $0 $5,091 $10,173 $2,100 $4,200 $2,100 (e) 2.88% > $10,000 2.88% > $20,000 3.36% > $25,000 3.36% > $50,000 4.24% > $50,000 4.24% > $100,000 4.54% > $150,000 4.54% > $300,000 Ark. 0.90% > $0 0.90% > $0 $2,200 $4,400 $26 $52 $26 (d, e, r) 2.50% > $4,299 2.50% > $4,299 3.50% > $8,399 3.50% > $8,399 4.50% > $12,599 4.50% > $12,599 6.00% > $20,999 6.00% > $20,999 6.90% > $35,099 6.90% > $35,099 Calif. 1.00% > $0 1.00% > $0 $4,044 $8,088 $109 $218 $337 (a, e, r, s) 2.00% > $7,850 2.00% > $15,700 4.00% > $18,610 4.00% > $37,220 6.00% > $29,372 6.00% > $58,744 8.00% > $40,773 8.00% > $81,546 9.30% > $51,530 9.30% > $103,060 10.30% > $263,222 10.30% > $526,444 11.30% > $315,866 11.30% > $631,732 12.30% > $526,443 12.30% > $1,000,000 13.30% > $1,000,000 13.30% > $1,052,886 Colo. 4.63% of federal taxable income 4.63% of federal taxable income n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Conn. 3.00% > $0 3.00% > $0 n.a. n.a. $15,000 $24,000 $0 (a, t, u) 5.00% > $10,000 5.00% > $20,000 5.50% > $50,000 5.50% > $100,000 6.00% > $100,000 6.00% > $200,000 6.50% > $200,000 6.50% > $400,000 6.90% > $250,000 6.90% > $500,000 6.99% > $500,000 6.99% > $1,000,000 Del. 2.20% > $2,000 2.20% > $2,000 $3,250 $6,500 $110 $220 $110 (f, r, v) 3.90% > $5,000 3.90% > $5,000 4.80% > $10,000 4.80% > $10,000 5.20% > $20,000 5.20% > $20,000 5.55% > $25,000 5.55% > $25,000 6.60% > $60,000 6.60% > $60,000 Fla. none none n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Ga. 1.00% > $0 1.00% > $0 $2,300 $3,000 $2,700 $7,400 $3,000 2.00% > $750 2.00% > $1,000 3.00% > $2,250 3.00% > $3,000 4.00% > $3,750 4.00% > $5,000 5.00% > $5,250 5.00% > $7,000 6.00% > $7,000 6.00% > $10,000 Hawaii 1.40% > $0 1.40% > $0 $2,200 $4,400 $1,144 $2,288 $1,144 (w) 3.20% > $2,400 3.20% > $4,800 5.50% > $4,800 5.50% > $9,600 6.40% > $9,600 6.40% > $19,200 6.80% > $14,400 6.80% > $28,800 7.20% > $19,200 7.20% > $38,400 7.60% > $24,000 7.60% > $48,000 7.90% > $36,000 7.90% > $72,000 8.25% > $48,000 8.25% > $96,000 Idaho 1.60% > $0 1.60% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $4,000 $8,000 $4,000 (a, e, p) 3.60% > $1,452 3.60% > $2,904 4.10% > $2,940 4.10% > $5,808 5.10% > $4,356 5.10% > $8,712 6.10% > $5,808 6.10% > $11,616 7.10% > $7,260 7.10% > $14,520 7.40% > $10,890 7.40% > $21,780 5 Ill. 3.75% of federal taxable income 3.75% of federal taxable income n.a. n.a. $2,125 $4,250 $2,125 Ind. (x) 3.3% of federal taxable income 3.3% of federal taxable income n.a. n.a. $1,000 $2,000 $1,500 Iowa 0.36% > $0 0.36% > $0 $1,970 $4,860 $40 $40 $40 (f, r) 0.72% > $1,554 0.72% > $1,554 2.43% > $3,108 2.43% > $3,108 4.50% > $6,216 4.50% > $6,216 6.12% > $13,896 6.12% > $13,896 6.48% > $23,310 6.48% > $23,310 6.80% > $31,080 6.80% > $31,080 7.92% > $46,620 7.92% > $46,620 8.98% > $69,930 8.98% > $69,930 Kans. 2.70% > $0 2.70% > $0 $3,000 $7,500 $2,250 $4,500 $2,250 4.60% > $15,000 4.60% > $30,000 Ky. 2.00% > $0 2.00% > $0 $2,460 $2,460 $10 $10 $10 (r) 3.00% > $3,000 3.00% > $3,000 4.00% > $4,000 4.00% > $4,000 5.00% > $5,000 5.00% > $5,000 5.80% > $8,000 5.80% > $8,000 6.00% > $75,000 6.00% > $75,000 La. 2.00% > $0 2.00% > $0 n.a. n.a. $4,500 $9,000 $1,000 (f, n) 4.00% > $12,500 4.00% > $25,000 6.00% > $50,000 6.00% > $100,000 Maine 5.80% > $0 5.80% > $0 $11,600 $23,200 $4,050 $8,100 $4,050 (e, p) 6.75% > $21,049 6.75% > $42,099 7.15% > $37,499 7.15% > $74,999 Md. 2.00% > $0 2.00% > $0 $2,000 $4,000 $3,200 $6,400 $3,200 (o, y) 3.00% > $1,000 3.00% > $1,000 4.00% > $2,000 4.00% > $2,000 4.75% > $3,000 4.75% > $3,000 5.00% > $100,000 5.00% > $150,000 5.25% > $125,000 5.25% > $175,000 5.50% > $150,000 5.50% > $225,000 5.75% > $250,000 5.75% > $300,000 Mass. 5.10% > $0 5.10% > $0 n.a. n.a. $4,400 $8,800 $1,000 Mich. 4.25% of federal AGI with modification 4.25% of federal AGI with modification n.a. n.a. $4,000 $4,000 n.a. Minn. 5.35% > $0 5.35% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $4,000 $8,000 $4,000 (p) 7.05% > $25,180 7.05% > $36,820 7.85% > $82,740 7.85% > $146,270 9.85% > $155,650 9.85% > $259,420 Miss. 3.00% > $0 3.00% > $0 $2,300 $4,600 $6,000 $12,000 $1,500 4.00% > $5,000 4.00% > $5,000 5.00% > $10,000 5.00% > $10,000 Mo. 1.50% > $0 1.50% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $2,100 $4,200 $1,200 (p) 2.00% > $1,000 2.00% > $1,000 2.50% > $2,000 2.50% > $2,000 3.00% > $3,000 3.00% > $3,000 3.50% > $4,000 3.50% > $4,000 4.00% > $5,000 4.00% > $5,000 4.50% > $6,000 4.50% > $6,000 5.00% > $7,000 5.00% > $7,000 5.50% > $8,000 5.50% > $8,000 6.00% > $9,000 6.00% > $9,000 Mont. 1.00% > $0 1.00% > $0 $4,370 $8,740 $2,330 $4,660 $2,330 (a, e, f, q) 2.00% > $2,900 2.00% > $2,900 3.00% > $5,100 3.00% > $5,100 4.00% > $7,800 4.00% > $7,800 5.00% > $10,500 5.00% > $10,500 6.00% > $13,500 6.00% > $13,500 6.90% > $17,400 6.90% > $17,400 State Individual Income Tax Rates and Brackets for 2016 Single Filer Married Filing Jointly Standard Deduction Personal Exemption State Rates Brackets Rates Brackets Single Couple Single Couple Dependent 6 Nebr. 2.46% > $0 2.46% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $131 $262 $131 (r, t) 3.51% > $3,060 3.51% > $6,120 5.01% > $18,370 5.01% > $36,730 6.84% > $29,590 6.84% > $59,180 Nev. none none n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. N.H. (c) 5.00% > $0 5.00% > $0 n.a n.a $2,400 $4,800 n.a. N.J. 1.40% > $0 1.40% > $0 n.a. n.a. $1,000 $2,000 $1,500 1.75% > $20,000 1.75% > $20,000 3.50% > $35,000 2.45% > $50,000 5.525% > $40,000 3.50% > $70,000 6.37% > $75,000 5.525% > $80,000 8.97% > $500,000 6.37% > $150,000 8.97% > $500,000 N.M. 1.70% > $0 1.70% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $4,000 $8,000 $4,000 (i) 3.20% > $5,500 3.20% > $8,000 4.70% > $11,000 4.70% > $16,000 4.90% > $16,000 4.90% > $24,000 N.Y. 4.00% > $0 4.00% > $0 $7,950 $15,950 n.a. n.a. $1,000 (t) 4.50% > $8,450 4.50% > $17,050 5.25% > $11,650 5.25% > $23,450 5.90% > $13,850 5.90% > $27,750 6.45% > $21,300 6.45% > $42,750 6.65% > $80,150 6.65% > $160,500 6.85% > $214,000 6.85% > $321,050 8.82% > $1,070,350 8.82% > $2,140,900 N.C. 5.75% > $0 5.75% > $0 $7,500 $15,000 n.a. n.a. n.a. N.D. 1.10% > $0 1.10% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $4,050 $8,100 $4,050 (e, p, z) 2.04% > $37,450 2.04% > $62,600 2.27% > $90,750 2.27% > $151,200 2.64% > $189,300 2.64% > $230,450 2.90% > $411,500 2.90% > $411,500 Ohio 0.495% > $0 0.495% > $0 n.a. n.a. $2,200 $4,400 $2,200 (a, e, g) 0.990% > $5,200 0.990% > $5,200 1.980% > $10,400 1.980% > $10,400 2.476% > $15,650 2.476% > $15,650 2.969% > $20,900 2.969% > $20,900 3.465% > $41,700 3.465% > $41,700 3.960% > $83,350 3.960% > $83,350 4.597% > $104,250 4.597% > $104,250 4.997% > $208,500 4.997% > $208,500 Okla. 0.50% > $0 0.50% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $1,000 $2,000 $1,000 (h) 1.00% > $1,000 1.00% > $2,000 2.00% > $2,500 2.00% > $5,000 3.00% > $3,750 3.00% > $7,500 4.00% > $4,900 4.00% > $9,800 5.00% > $7,200 5.00% > $12,200 Ore. 5.00% > $0 5.00% > $0 $2,145 $4,295 $195 $390 $195 (e, f, r, aa) 7.00% > $3,350 7.00% > $6,500 9.00% > $8,400 9.00% > $16,300 9.90% > $125,000 9.90% > $250,000 Pa. 3.07% > $0 3.07% > $0 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. R.I. 3.75% > $0 3.75% > $0 $8,300 $16,600 $3,900 $7,800 $3,900 (k) 4.75% > $60,850 4.75% > $60,850 5.99% > $138,300 5.99% > $138,300 S.C. 0.00% > $0 0.00% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $4,000 $8,000 $4,000 (e, p) 3.00% > $2,920 3.00% > $2,920 4.00% > $5,840 4.00% > $5,840 5.00% > $8,760 5.00% > $8,760 6.00% > $11,680 6.00% > $11,680 7.00% > $14,600 7.00% > $14,600 S.D. none none n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Tenn. (c) 6.00% > $0 6.00% > $0 n.a. n.a. $1,250 $2,500 n.a. State Individual Income Tax Rates and Brackets for 2016 Single Filer Married Filing Jointly Standard Deduction Personal Exemption State Rates Brackets Rates Brackets Single Couple Single Couple Dependent 7 Tex. none none n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Utah 5.00% > $0 5.00% > $0 (l) (l) $3,000 $6,000 $3,000 Vt. 3.55% > $0 3.55% > $0 $6,300 $12,600 $4,050 $8,100 $4,050 (e, p) 6.80% > $39,900 6.80% > $69,900 7.80% > $93,400 7.80% > $160,450 8.80% > $192,400 8.80% > $240,000 8.95% > $415,600 8.95% > $421,900 Va. 2.00% > $0 2.00% > $0 $3,000 $6,000 $930 $1,860 $930 3.00% > $3,000 3.00% > $3,000 5.00% > $5,000 5.00% > $5,000 5.75% > $17,000 5.75% > $17,000 Wash. none none n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. W.Va. 3.00% > $0 3.00% > $0 n.a. n.a. $2,000 $4,000 $2,000 4.00% > $10,000 4.00% > $10,000 4.50% > $25,000 4.50% > $25,000 6.00% > $40,000 6.00% > $40,000 6.50% > $60,000 6.50% > $60,000 Wis. 4.00% > $0 4.00% > $0 $10,270 $19,010 $700 $1,400 $700 (e, m) 5.84% > $11,150 5.84% > $14,820 6.27% > $22,230 6.27% > $29,640 7.65% > $244,750 7.65% > $326,330 Wyo. none none n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. D.C. 4.00% > $0 4.00% > $0 $5,200 $8,350 $1,775 $3,550 $1,775 (j) 6.00% > $10,000 6.00% > $10,000 6.50% > $40,000 6.50% > $40,000 8.50% > $60,000 8.50% > $60,000 8.75% > $350,000 8.75% > $350,000 8.95% > $1,000,000 8.95% > $1,000,000 (a) 2015 tax information. (b) For single taxpayers with AGI below $20,000, the standard deduction is $2,500. This standard deduction amount is reduced by $25 for every additional $500 of AGI, not to fall below $2,000. For married taxpayers filing jointly with AGI below $20,000, the standard deduction is $7,500. This standard deduction amount is reduced by $175 for every additional $500, not to fall below $4,000. For all taxpayers claiming a dependent with AGI below $20,000, the dependent exemption is $1,000. This amount is reduced to $500 per dependent for taxpayers with AGI above $20,000 and below $100,000. For taxpayers with over $100,000 AGI, the dependent exemption is $300 per dependent. (c) Applies to interest and dividend income only. (d) Rates apply to individuals earning more than $75,000. Two special tax tables exist for low- and middle-income individuals. One for individuals below $21,000 in income, and one for those between $21,000 and $75,000. (e) Bracket levels adjusted for inflation each year. Release dates for tax bracket inflation adjustments vary by state and may fall after the end of the applicable tax year. (f) These states allow some or all of federal income tax paid to be deducted from state taxable income. (g) Ohio’s personal and dependent exemptions are $2,200 for an AGI of $40,000 or less, $1,950 if AGI is between $40,001 and $79,999, and $1,700 if AGI is $80,000 or above. (h) The top rate is scheduled to be reduced to 4.85% in subsequent tax years, contingent upon certain revenue growth. (i) Tied to federal tax system, plus an additional $2,500 if federal AGI is equal to or less than $36,667 (single) or $55,000 (married filing jointly). (j) Exemptions are phased out by 2% for every $2,500 in income above $150,000. (k) The phase-out range for the personal exemption and deduction is $192,700 - $214,700. The exemptions and deductions are completely phased out at modified federal AGI of $214,700. (l) The standard deduction is taken in the form of a nonrefundable credit of 6% of the federal standard or itemized deduction amount, excluding the deduction for state or local income tax. This credit phases out (in 2014) at 1.3 cents per dollar above $13,590 of AGI ($27,180 for married couples). (m) The standard deduction phases out by 12% at $14,800 for single filers and 19.778% at $21,360 for married taxpayers filing jointly. The standard deduction phases out to zero at $100,383 for single filers, $117,477 for joint filers. (n) Standard deduction and personal exemptions are combined: $4,500 for single filers and married taxpayers filing separately; $9,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly and heads of household. State Individual Income Tax Rates and Brackets for 2016 Single Filer Married Filing Jointly Standard Deduction Personal Exemption State Rates Brackets Rates Brackets Single Couple Single Couple Dependent 8 (o) The standard deduction is 15% of income with a minimum of $1,500 and a cap of $2,000 for single filers, married filing separately filers and dependent filers earning more than $13,333. The standard deduction is a minimum of $3,000 and capped at $4,000 for married filing jointly filers, head of household filers and qualifying widowers earning more than $26,667. (p) Deduction or exemption tied to federal tax system. Federal deductions and exemptions are indexed for inflation. (q) Montana filers’ standard deduction is 20% of AGI. For single taxpayers, the deduction must be between $1,940 and $4,370. For married taxpayers, the deduction must be between $3,880 and $8,740. (r) Tax Credit instead of a deduction. (s) Exemption credits phase out for single taxpayers by $6 for each $2,500 of AGI above $178,706 and for joint filers by $12 for each $2,500 of AGI above $357,417. The credit cannot be reduced to below zero. (t) Connecticut, New York, and Nebraska have “tax benefit recapture,” by which many high-income taxpayers pay their top tax rate on all income, not just on amounts above the benefit threshold. (u) Connecticut taxpayers are also given a personal tax credit based upon certain income constraints, which completely phases out by $1,000 for every $1,000 of AGI over $30,000. (v) In addition to the personal income tax rates, Delaware imposes a tax on lump-sum distributions. (w) Additionally, Hawaii allows any taxpayer, other than a corporation, acting as a business entity in more than one state who is required by this chapter to file a return to elect to report and pay a tax of 0.5% of its annual gross sales (1) where the taxpayer’s only activities in this state consist of sales; and (2) who does not own or rent real estate or tangible personal property; and (3) whose annual gross sales in or into this state during the tax year is not in excess of $100,000. Haw. Rev. Stat. § 235-51 (2015). (x) $1,000 is a base exemption. If dependents meet certain conditions, filers can take an additional $1,500 exemption for each. (y) The exemption amount has the following phase out schedule: If AGI is above $100,000 but below $125,000, the exemption is $1,600; if AGI is above $125,000 but below $150,000, the exemption is $800; if AGI is above $150,000, there is no exemption. (z) Federal Taxable income is the starting point for North Dakota, so the federal standard deduction and exemptions are built in. (aa) The personal exemption credit is not allowed if federal AGI exceeds $100,000 for single filers or $200,000 for joint filers.

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I am an accomplished content marketing professional helping you to build your brand and business. In my current role, I fulfill a multi-faceted solution marketplace including: publishing and sharing your content, embedding a document viewer on your website, improving your content’s search engine optimization, generating leads with gated content and earning money by selling your documents. I gobble up documents, storing them for safekeeping and releasing the text for excellent search engine optimization, lead generation and earned income. 

Publishing documents on edocr.com is a proven way to start demand generation for your products and services. Thousands of professionals and businesses publish marketing, sales, operations, customer service and financial documents making it easier for prospects and customers to find content, helping them to make informed decisions.

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