FLORIDA Official Florida Driver License Handbook

Jan 8, 2017 | Publisher: edocr | Category: Civic & Government |  | Collection: Tidbits | Views: 6 | Likes: 1

FLORIDA CLASS E DRIVER LICENSE OFFICIAL HANDBOOK FOR 2015 Customer Service Center ................................................ 850/617-2000 DHSMV Official Website ........................................................ flhsmv.gov Online Transactions (DHSMV Virtual Office) .................. GoRenew.com Identification Requirements ....................................GatherGoGet.com To Order a Crash Report .................................................. 850/617-3416 Neil Kirkman Building 2900 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, Florida 32399 Our Mission Providing Highway Safety and Security through Excellence in Service, Education and Enforcement. Our Vision A Safer Florida Our Values We believe in: Service by exceeding expectations; Integrity by upholding the highest ethical standards; Courtesy by treating everyone with dignity and respect; Professionalism by inspiring confidence and trust; Innovation by fostering creativity; and Excellence in all we do! ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. All rights reserved. No portion of this material may be modified in any way for distribution or publication without the express prior written permission of the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. Cover Photo by Kim Seng, CaptainKimo.com. The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 iii INTRODUCTION The Official Florida Driver License Handbook is produced by the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV). This guide has the information you need to prepare for the Florida Driver License Class E knowledge and skills exams and to help you drive safely and lawfully. Disclaimer The Official Florida Driver License Handbook contains many condensed and paraphrased points of Florida laws and provides safety advice not specifically addressed in the laws. The handbook is not a legal authority and is not intended for use in court. This handbook will not reflect any changes made by the Florida Legislature after the last revision date (located at the bottom of this page). Warning Florida law prohibits using a false name, making a false statement, concealing a material fact or otherwise using fraud in an application for a driver license or identification card. The penalty can be up to five years in prison, a $5,000 fine, and suspension of any existing driving privilege for at least one year. In addition, it is illegal to permit or authorize an unlicensed person to drive a motor vehicle. Doing so can result in a 60 day jail sentence and a $500 fine. If the vehicle is involved in a crash resulting in bodily injury or death of any person, the person who permitted the unlicensed person to drive shall have his/her license suspended for one year. Public Records Florida law requires the DHSMV to collect certain personal information during the licensing process. This information, which identifies licensed individuals, is used for records management, driver improvement, financial responsibility, and law enforcement purposes. If you do not provide the required information, you will not receive a driver license or identification card. Florida’s Public Records Law makes all records made or received by DHSMV in the course of its official business available for inspection, unless specifically exempted by law. Your personal information, including name, address, and driver license number is exempt from public disclosure, but may be given to law enforcement agencies and other entities permitted by law to get the information. Your medical information, social security number, and emergency contact information are available only as specifically authorized by law. We strive to ensure the accuracy of the information we obtain during the licensing process. If you discover any incorrect information, please call us at (850) 617-2000 or mail your request with your complete name, date of birth, driver license number, information about the error, and any documentation to support your request to: iv ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Chief of the Bureau of Records, 2900 Apalachee Parkway MS 89, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0575. Some information, such as reports of convictions we received from a court, can only be corrected if we received notification from the court that the report was in error. IMPORTANT LAW CHANGES FOR 2015 §48.03, Florida Statutes: Adds civil traffic cases to the types of court cases for which service of process may be made on a witness by US mail. §119.0712, Florida Statutes: Customer e-mail addresses collected by the DHSMV while conducting driver license and motor vehicle record transactions are exempt from the state’s public records laws. §316.614, Florida Statutes: Exempts a USPS rural letter carrier from safety belt usage requirements while performing duties on a designated postal route. §316.1964, Florida Statutes: Exempts a vehicle displaying a Disabled Veteran “DV” license plate from paying parking fees charged by a county, municipality, or any agency that provides timed parking spaces. §316.212, Florida Statutes: Allows for the use of golf carts on a two-lane county road located within the jurisdiction of a municipality which has designated the road for use by golf carts. §316.228, Florida Statutes: Requires 18 inch square, red flags on all loads that extend beyond the sides of a vehicle or four feet or more beyond a vehicle’s rear. §318.18, Florida Statutes: Increases the fine from $100 to $500 for a violation of unlawfully displaying vehicles for sale, hire, or rental. §320.02 & 322.08, Florida Statutes: Authorizes DHSMV to collect $1 or more voluntary contributions for the Florida Breast Cancer Coalition Research Foundation, Inc., through the vehicle registration, driver license and identification card applications. §322.051, 322.08, 322.14, Florida Statutes: Provides for DHSMV to accept military identification cards to meet certain requirements for issuance of a driver license or identification card. §322.08, Florida Statutes: Requires DHSMV, and their authorized agents, to provide each applicant for a motor vehicle registration or driver license the option to register emergency contact information and the option to be contacted with information about state and federal benefits available as a result of military service. §320.0848, Florida Statutes: Allows disabled veterans to provide USDVA Form letter 27-333 or its equivalent to renew or replace a disabled parking permit. §627.041 & 627.728, Florida Statutes: Removes the four vehicle maximum to allow vehicle owners to purchase, and insurers to issue, single policies that cover any number of private passenger motor vehicles. The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 v TABLE OF CONTENTS Contact Info ...................... Inside Front Cover Introduction .............................................................. i Public Records ......................................................... i Law Changes for 2015 .............................................ii PART 1: DRIVING IN FLORIDA ........................ 1 1. Preparing to Drive: Your Vehicle .............. 3 Getting Ready to Drive ...........................................3 Equipment Standards ...........................................3 Required Equipment ..............................................3 Equipment NOT Permitted ...................................4 Bumper Height Requirements .............................4 Keep Your Car in Good Condition .......................4 Anti-Lock Brake System ........................................5 Trailers, Towing, & Load ........................................5 Drawbar or Towing Connection ...........................5 Securing the Load ..................................................6 Projecting Load .......................................................6 Slow Moving Vehicle ..............................................6 2. Preparing to Drive: You—the Driver ......... 7 Physical Conditions ...............................................7 Drowsy Driving ........................................................7 Emotions ..................................................................7 Road Rage ................................................................8 Distracted Driving ...................................................8 Drinking & Driving ...................................................9 The Dangers of Drinking & Driving ......................9 Other Drugs and Driving ........................................9 Senior Drivers .......................................................10 Florida 511 Traffic Info .........................................10 3. Occupant Protection ............................ 11 Seat Belts & Child Restraints ..............................11 Leaving Children Unsupervised in Vehicles ....12 4. Traffic Controls .................................... 13 Pavement Markings ..............................................13 Edge Lines ..............................................................13 White Lane Lines ...................................................13 Yellow Lane Lines .................................................13 Turn Lanes..............................................................14 Reversible Lanes ...................................................14 Bicycle Lanes .........................................................14 White Stop Lines ...................................................14 Crosswalks .............................................................15 Other Markings ......................................................15 Traffic Signs ............................................................15 Traffic Sign Colors ................................................15 Traffic Sign Shapes ...............................................16 Regulatory Signs ...................................................16 Warning Signs ........................................................18 Informational Signs ..............................................21 Traffic Control Signals ..........................................21 Steady Signal Lights .............................................21 Flashing Signal Lights ..........................................22 Lane Signals...........................................................23 Ramp Signals .........................................................23 Pedestrian Signals ................................................23 Zones of Caution ..................................................24 School Zone Signs & Signals ..............................24 Railroad Crossing Signs & Signals .....................24 Drawbridge Signs & Signals ................................25 Construction/Maintenance Signs & Signals ....26 5. Driving Safely ...................................... 27 Speed Limits ..........................................................27 Braking Distance ...................................................28 Smooth Stops........................................................29 Making Turns .........................................................29 Three-Point Turn ..................................................30 Intersections ..........................................................30 Open Intersections ...............................................30 Right-of-Way ..........................................................30 Roundabouts .........................................................31 Driveways ...............................................................31 Traffic Lanes ...........................................................31 Safe Following Distances ....................................32 Following Distance for Trucks ............................33 Blind Spots .............................................................33 Passing ....................................................................33 Passing on the Right ............................................34 Where You Must Not Pass... .................................34 Being Passed .........................................................34 Limited Access Highways ....................................34 Entering & Leaving Interstate Highways...........35 Interstate Safety Reminders ...............................36 Parking ....................................................................36 Parking Lights .......................................................36 Straight-in Parking ................................................36 Parking on Hills .....................................................36 vi ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Table of Contents Continued Where Parking is Not Allowed ............................37 Backing Up .............................................................37 6. Sharing the Road ................................. 39 Sharing the Road with Pedestrians ...................39 Rules for Motorists ................................................39 Rules for Pedestrians ...........................................39 Right-of-Way ..........................................................39 Pedestrian Safety Tips .........................................40 Sharing the Road with Bicycles .........................40 Rules for Motorists ................................................40 Rules for Bicyclists ................................................41 Bicyclist Safety Tips ..............................................41 Motorcycle Awareness .........................................42 Rules for Motorcycle/Moped ..............................42 Tips for Motorists ..................................................42 School Buses .........................................................43 School Crossings ..................................................43 Emergency Vehicles .............................................44 Funeral Processions .............................................44 Florida’s Move Over Law ......................................44 Public Transit .........................................................44 Commercial Vehicles ...........................................44 Rules for Motorists ................................................44 Passing Commercial Vehicles ............................45 Golf Carts ................................................................46 Low Speed Vehicles..............................................46 7. Special Driving Situations ..................... 47 Night Driving ..........................................................47 Low Visibility ..........................................................48 Rain .........................................................................48 Animals ...................................................................49 Following Law Enforcement Instructions ........49 8. Handling Emergencies .......................... 51 Defensive Driving ..................................................51 Avoiding Rear-end Collisions .............................51 Breakdowns ...........................................................52 Vehicle Approaching in Your Lane .....................52 Right Wheels Off Pavement ................................52 Overcorrection ......................................................52 Skidding..................................................................52 Emergency Braking ..............................................52 Brake Failure ..........................................................53 Wet Brakes .............................................................53 Jammed Gas Pedal ..............................................53 Tire Blowout ..........................................................53 Fire ...........................................................................53 Stalled on Railroad Tracks ..................................54 Submerged Vehicles ............................................54 Your Responsibilities After a Crash ....................54 Leaving the Scene.................................................55 “Hit & Run” Penalties ...........................................55 First Aid ...................................................................55 9. Your Driving Privilege ........................... 57 Insurance Laws .....................................................57 The No-Fault Law .................................................57 The Financial Responsibility Law ......................58 Vehicle Licensing ..................................................59 Applying for Title, Plates & Registration ...........60 Renewal ..................................................................60 Violations of the License Law .............................60 Time Restrictions for Minors ...............................61 Littering ..................................................................61 Road Damage ........................................................61 Driving Under the Influence (DUI) .....................61 Implied Consent Law ...........................................61 Penalties for DUI ...................................................62 Zero Tolerance ......................................................62 Traffic Crashes .......................................................63 Three Crashes in Three Years Law .....................63 Point System ..........................................................63 Mandatory Restriction for Minors ......................64 Losing the Privilege to Drive ...............................64 Administrative Hearings ......................................66 PART 2: THE FLORIDA DRIVER LICENSE ........ 67 10. Getting Your License or ID Card ............. 69 Who Needs a Florida License to Drive? ............69 Exceptions for the Florida Driver License.........69 Florida Driver License Classifications ...............70 Requirements for Class E License .....................70 Learner’s License ..................................................71 Reciprocity .............................................................71 Traffic Law & Substance Abuse Education ......71 Parent’s Consent for Minors ................................71 Physical & Mental Requirements .......................71 The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 vii IMPORTANT INFO FOR MINOR DRIVERS Learners License Age 15–17 • Must always drive accompanied by a licensed driver, age 21 or older, who rides in the closest seat to the right of the driver. • Must only drive during daylight hours during the first 3 months after earning learner license. After 3 months, may drive until 10 pm. • Must have at least 50 hours driving experience prior to getting Class E License, and 10 hours should be at night. Licensed Driver Age 16 Must not drive between 11 pm to 6 am unless driving to or from work OR accompanied by a licensed driver who is age 21 or older. Licensed Driver Age 17 Must not drive between 1 am to 5 am unless driving to or from work OR accompanied by a licensed driver who is age 21 or older. Driving Record Points Any driver under the age of 18 who accumulates 6 or more points within a 12 month period is automatically restricted for one year to driving for “Business Purposes ONLY.” Remember... Always carry your driver license with you when driving, and always have proof of vehicle registration and insurance with you in the vehicle you are driving. Restriction Codes .................................................72 Identification Requirements ..............................73 Primary Identification ..........................................73 Proof of Social Security Number .......................75 Proof of Residential Address ..............................76 Identification Cards ..............................................77 ID Cards for Persons at/below Poverty Level ..77 License Renewal ...................................................77 Renewal Issuance Requirements ......................77 Renewal Options ..................................................78 Military Renewal by Mail or Online ....................78 License/ID Card Replacement ...........................79 Replacement Requirements...............................79 Change of Address ................................................79 Name Changes ......................................................80 Veterans ..................................................................80 Veteran Designation on License or ID Card .....80 Exempt Fees for 100% Disabled US Vets ..........80 Disabled Parking Permit ......................................80 Selective Service ...................................................81 Sexual Offenders & Sexual Predators ...............81 Career Offenders ...................................................81 Florida Organ & Tissue Donor Program ...........82 Voluntary Contributions ......................................82 Emergency Contact Information .......................82 Fees .........................................................................83 11. Driving School Providers ...................... 85 TLSAE Course Providers ......................................85 Third Party Driver License Exams ......................85 Advanced Driver Improvement Courses ..........85 Basic Driver Improvement Course ....................85 Licensed DUI Programs .......................................86 Mature Driver Insurance Courses.......................86 12. Driver License Testing .......................... 87 Testing Methods ....................................................87 License Examinations ..........................................87 Vision .......................................................................87 Class E Knowledge Exam ....................................88 Vehicle Inspection ................................................88 Driving Skills Exam ...............................................89 TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ............................ 91 flhsmv.gov online services ... Inside Back Cover viii ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Congratulations! If you are reading this handbook, you are most likely taking the first step in joining the ranks of over 15 million licensed drivers in Florida. The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles produces this Official Florida Driver License Handbook to provide you with the information you need to learn the rules of the road, understand traffic controls, and drive safely under various circumstances. Operating a motor vehicle is one of the most dangerous activities you can undertake and driver education can save your life. Review this handbook thoroughly to ensure your safety and the safety of over 19 million Floridians and close to 100 million tourists who travel our roads. Driving a car is a tremendous responsibility that can unlock a world of opportunity. On behalf of DHSMV, we welcome you to join us in upholding our vision: A Safer Florida. Keep your eyes on the road, your hands on the wheel, and your mind on driving. Safe travels, Terry L. Rhodes, Executive Director Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 1 1. Preparing to Drive: Your Vehicle 2. Preparing to Drive: You—the Driver 3. Occupant Protection 4. Traffic Controls 5. Driving Safely 6. Sharing the Road 7. Special Driving Situations 8. Handling Emergencies 9. Your Driving Privilege Part 1–Driving in Florida 2 ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles 1 The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 3 Getting Ready to Drive Before you start your engine: • be sure vehicle is in park or neutral. • adjust the seat so you can reach all controls. • adjust all rear-view mirrors so that you can use them without having to lean forward or backward. • move anything that blocks your view of mirrors or roadway. • lock all car doors. • put on your seat belt and make sure all passengers do the same. Equipment Standards The equipment on your car must meet certain standards. You may be stopped at any time by law enforcement for a vehicle inspection. Required Equipment Brakes Two braking systems. Each must be able to stop the car alone. The parking or emergency brake should be strong enough to hold the car on any hill. Low Beam Headlights Show objects 150 feet ahead. Visible from 1,000 feet. High Beam Headlights Show objects 450 feet ahead. Visible from 1,000 feet. Taillights Two red taillights. Visible from 1,000 feet. Brake lights Two red brake lights. Visible from 300 feet in the daytime. License Plate Light White light that makes the plate visible from 50 feet. Directional Signals Amber or white (front) or red (rear). Visible from 500 feet. Horn Heard from a distance of 200 feet. Mirrors At least one rear-view mirror with view 200 feet to the rear. Windshield Wiper In good working order to clear the driver’s view. Windshields* Must be safety glass and may not be covered or treated with any material that makes the windshield reflective or non- transparent. Must be free of any stickers not required by law. Side & Rear Windows* May not be composed of, covered by, or treated with any material which has a highly reflective or mirrored appearance and reflects more than 25% of the light (side windows) or more than 35% of the light (rear window). Tires Should have visible tread of at least 2/32 of an inch across the base with no worn spots showing the ply. PREPARING TO DRIVE: YOUR VEHICLE *See FS §316.2953 and FS §316.2954 for details on window tint restrictions. 4 ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Equipment NOT Permitted Red lights visible from front or blue lights. For emergency/law enforcement vehicles only. A siren, bell, or whistle. A very loud muffler (heard from more than 50 feet) or one that emits smoke. Signs, posters, or stickers on the windshield or windows (except if required by law). A television that the driver can see. More than two spotlights, cowl or fender lights, fog lights, or other extra lights. Headsets/headphones worn by driver while operating a vehicle. Bumper Height Requirements Owners of automobiles and pickup trucks are required to have both front and rear bumpers mounted within certain height levels. Height limitations are governed by the net shipping weight of the vehicle, not the modified or altered weight. The maximum allowable heights between the pavement and bottom of the front and rear bumper are: Vehicle Weight Front Rear Cars < 2500 lbs. 22 in. 22 in. Cars 2500–3499 lbs. 24 in. 26 in. Cars ≥ 3500 lbs. 27 in. 29 in. Trucks < 2000 lbs. 24 in. 26 in. Trucks 2000–3000 lbs. 27 in. 29 in. Trucks 3000–5000 lbs. 28 in. 30 in. EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES It is illegal to tamper with, remove, or cause not to work any pollution control device on your vehicle. Tampering will damage your vehicle and can cause increased air pollution, lower gas mileage, less vehicle efficiency, breathing difficulties. Keep Your Car in Good Condition Brakes: Check to see that the pedal stays well above the floor when you step on it. If the car pulls to one side when you use the brakes or if you hear any scraping or squealing noises, your brakes may need to be repaired. Lights: Replace burned-out bulbs and keep lenses clean. Tires: Inspect often for proper inflation/tire pressure, even tread wear, and damage. Windows and Windshields: Keep the glass clean inside and out. Rear window: If the rear window is covered by or treated with any material that makes it nontransparent, the vehicle must be equipped with side mirrors on both sides that allow the driver a view to the rear of at least 200 feet. Read Your Vehicle Owner’s Manual! It is an excellent resource for information specific to your vehicle, such as: what types of fluids your car requires, what dashboard warning lights mean, what your car services intervals are, and more. The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 5 .................................................................................................PREPARING TO DRIVE: YOUR VEHICLE Anti-Lock Brake System Anti-lock brake system (ABS) prevents skidding and allows drivers to steer during an emergency braking situation. ABS can help improve vehicle stability, steering ability, and stopping capability. It is important to know if you have ABS because it will affect the way you should stop in an emergency situation. With conventional brakes, you pump the brakes in order to stop in an emergency situation where traction is lost and the vehicle slides. However, drivers with ABS need to press down hard on the brake pedal, hold it, and steer out of danger. In an emergency situation, the ABS automatically pumps the brakes at a faster rate than the driver could. Removing steady pressure from the brake pedal or pumping the brakes will disengage or “turn off” the ABS. You can determine if the car has ABS by looking for a lighted ABS symbol on the dashboard right after starting the engine, checking the owner’s manual, or asking the dealer. Trailers, Towing, & Load Equipment Requirements: • Trailer, semitrailer or pole trailer weighing 3,000 pounds or less: ◆ REAR—two reflectors, one at each side.* ◆ A brake light if the trailer or load blocks the brake lights on the towing vehicle. • Trailer or semitrailer weighing more than 3,000 pounds: ◆ FRONT—two clearance lamps, one at each side. ◆ EACH SIDE—two side marker lamps, one at or near the front and one at or near the rear. Two reflectors, one at or near the front and one at or near the rear. ◆ REAR— two clearance lamps, one at each side, and two reflectors, one at or near the front and one at or near the rear.* ◆ Brakes that can be operated by the driver in the towing vehicle. They must be designed and connected so that they will automatically stop the trailer if it breaks away from the towing vehicle. • Pole trailer weighing more than 3,000 pounds: ◆ EACH SIDE—one side marker lamp and one clearance lamp. ◆ REAR—two reflectors, one at each side.* *Every motor vehicle, trailer, semitrailer, and pole trailer must have two or more stop lamps (one stop lamp is permitted on vehicles built before January 1, 1972). Drawbar or Towing Connection The drawbar or towing connection must: • be strong enough to pull all towed weight; 6 ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles • not be more than 15 feet long unless you are towing poles, pipes, machinery, or other objects that cannot be easily taken apart; • have a white flag at least 12 inches square attached to it if it is chain, rope, or cable. Securing the Load You must not drive or move any loaded vehicle on the highway if the load is not secure. The load must not be able to drop, shift, leak, or otherwise escape. • You must use a close-fitting cover when hauling loads which could fall or blow onto the roadway (e.g., dirt, sand, gravel). • Every truck carrying logs or pulpwood must use lock chains to securely fasten the load. Projecting Load A load that extends beyond the sides of a vehicle more than four feet or more beyond its rear must be clearly marked. During the day, red flags at least 18 inches square must mark the extremities of the load. From sunset to sunrise, and during any rain, smoke, or fog: • two red lamps on the back of the load which can be seen from at least 500 feet to the rear; • two red reflectors on the rear which can be seen from 100 to 600 feet when directly in front of low beam headlights, and located to show the load’s full width; • one red lamp on each side of the load, visible from at least 500 feet to show maximum overhang of load. If the trailer or motor vehicle is transporting logs, long pulpwood, poles, or posts that extend more than four feet beyond the rear of the load, you must have one amber strobe-type lamp equipped so that the lamp is visible from the rear and both sides of the projecting load. The lamp must be operational and seen any time of day or night. Passenger vehicles must not be driven on any highway with a load extending beyond the fenders on the left side of the vehicle or extending more than 6 inches beyond the line of the fenders on the right side. Slow Moving Vehicle Farm vehicles designed for operation at speeds less than 25 mph must display this sign on the rear when using public highways (not limited access/interstates Also these vehicles can only be operated during daylight hours unless equipped with the proper lights/reflectors required for night driving. 2 The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 7 PREPARING TO DRIVE: YOU—THE DRIVER Driving an automobile is a huge responsibility. In order to drive safely, you must be fully engaged: hands on the wheel, eyes on the road, and your mind on driving. Anything that affects your physical or mental condition can impair your ability to drive. Physical Conditions It is important that you get regular vision, hearing, and general physical check-ups. Get treatment for illnesses and avoid driving when sick. Remember that whenever you are prescribed medication, you should ask your doctor or pharmacist how it can affect your driving. Drowsy Driving Drowsy driving can be just as dangerous as drunk driving. Do not drive when you are tired. It is risky to drive drowsy because fatigue (being sleepy) can: • slow down your thought processes and reaction time; • affect your judgment and vision; • impair your senses and abilities; • cause micro-sleeping (“nodding off”) or falling completely asleep. The two main causes of drowsy driving are lack of quality/quantity of sleep and driving at times of the day when you would normally be sleeping. Avoid driving drowsy! 1. Don’t drive at times when you would normally be asleep. 2. Get a good night’s sleep before you travel. 3. On long trips, take a break every 100 miles or 2 hours. 4. If you think you might fall asleep—find a safe place to stop and take a nap. 5. Use the “buddy system” and switch drivers when needed. Emotions Emotions can have an effect on driving safely. You may not be able to drive well if you are worried, excited, crying, angry, or depressed. Emotions can distract you from your driving because your mind is “somewhere else.” Your emotional state can alter the way you react—or overreact—to driving situations. Take time to calm down and get focused before driving. 8 ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Road Rage Road rage is violent or visibly angry behavior by a driver which can result in crashes or other incidents on roadways. Signs of road rage include: • sudden acceleration or braking, • following too closely, • cutting off other drivers, • preventing other vehicles from merging into your lane, • excessively hitting the horn or flashing headlights, • shouting obscenities or threats, • making obscene hand gestures, • intentionally causing a crash, • getting out of a vehicle in an attempt to start a confrontation, • using a weapon or threatening to use a weapon, • throwing objects from the vehicle. If another driver is threatening you or intentionally driving dangerously around you, remain calm and try to put as much distance between you and them as possible. Slow down and let them pass.† Do not make eye contact; do not make obscene gestures. If you need help, call *FHP (*347) or 911. Distracted Driving Distracted driving is extremely risky behavior that puts not only you and your passengers in danger, but also pedestrians and bicyclists sharing the road. Focused attention on driving helps to prevent crashes. In 2014, nearly 3000 crashes were caused by teen drivers who were not paying attention. (Source: DHSMV.) There are three main categories of driver distraction: CATEGORIES OF DISTRACTION Visual taking your eyes off the road Manual taking your hands off the steering wheel Cognitive thinking about anything other than driving Texting requires all three types of distraction, making it one of the most dangerous of distracted driving behaviors.** However, this is not the only cause of distracted driving. Other common distractions include: • talking on a cell phone; • watching an object, person, or event outside of the vehicle; • reaching for an object; • interacting with passengers; • eating or drinking; • unsecured pets; • grooming; • adjusting radio or climate controls; • lighting a cigarette; • daydreaming. **It is illegal in Florida to operate a motor vehicle while texting. In 2014, there were over 1600 citations issued in Florida for texting and driving. (Source: DHSMV.) †Florida Law states that a driver must move out of the left lane when being overtaken from behind by another vehicle traveling at a higher rate of speed. The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 9 .......................................................................................... PREPARING TO DRIVE: YOU—THE DRIVER Drinking & Driving If you drink alcohol—even just one drink—your chances of being in a crash are much greater than if you did not drink any alcohol. No one can drink alcohol and drive safely, even if you have been driving for many years. Because drinking alcohol and driving is so dangerous, the penalties are very tough. People who drive after drinking risk heavy fines, higher insurance rates, loss of license, and even jail sentences. A DUI conviction will remain on your driving record for 75 years. Drinking & Driving is Dangerous Alcohol reduces all of the important skills necessary to drive safely, such as judgment, reaction, vision, and concentration. Alcohol is absorbed into the lining of the stomach and then passes directly into the bloodstream and reaches your brain within minutes after consumption. A person’s judgment is the first thing affected after drinking an alcoholic beverage. Even one drink of alcohol can affect your driving. Alcohol slows your reflexes and reaction time, reduces your ability to see clearly, and makes you less alert. You will have trouble judging distance, speed, and movement of other vehicles. You will also have trouble controlling your vehicle. Do Not Drink and Drive! • Before drinking, designate a sober driver. • If you are the designated driver, do not drink. One drink is one too many. • If you are impaired—and did not designate a driver—take a taxi, call a sober family member, or use public transportation to get home safely. • Remember, friends don’t let friends drive drunk. If you know someone who is about to drive impaired, take their keys and help them get a safe ride home. Other Drugs and Driving Besides alcohol, there are many other drugs both legal and illegal— prescription, over-the-counter, controlled substance, marijuana— that can affect a person’s ability to drive safely. These drugs can have effects like those of alcohol, or even worse. Some drugs taken for headaches, colds, and allergies can make you too drowsy to drive. Energy pills and diet pills can make you dizzy, unable to concentrate, and affect your vision. Other prescription drugs can impair your reflexes, judgment, vision, and alertness in ways similar to alcohol. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist about the effects your prescription may have on driving. Read the labels on over-the-counter 10 ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles medicines to determine if their side effects can impair your driving. Never drink alcohol while you are taking medication. These can multiply the effects of alcohol or have additional effects of their own. These effects not only reduce your ability to be a safe driver but could cause serious health problems—even death. Senior Drivers As we age, physical changes require us to adapt so that we can continue to drive safely. Older drivers should: • Get regular medical and eye exams to identify physical and mental conditions that may affect driving. • Ask the doctor or pharmacist how medications—especially when taken in combination with other medications—affect driving. • Consult with a doctor about an exercise program to maintain the flexibility and strength needed for safe driving. • Make vehicle adjustments as necessary. If it becomes difficult to turn the steering wheel, get a steering knob. If you have difficulty turning your head to check blind spots, get a larger side mirror. • Avoid wearing sunglasses in dim or dark conditions. • Avoid risky driving times: ◆ Dusk, dawn, and nighttime. ◆ Bad weather. ◆ Rush-hour traffic. ◆ Fast-paced highways. Florida GrandDriver provides information about various steps drivers may take to maintain independence as long as possible, as well as actions one can take to stay mobile in their community when no longer driving. To learn more, search for “Florida GrandDriver” on the DHSMV website. Florida 511 Traffic Info Always be prepared! The Florida 511 Traveler Information System is a toll-free service by the Florida Department of Transportation that provides real-time traffic information on crashes, travel times, congestion, lane closures, severe weather, and construction on Florida’s interstates, toll roads, and other major metropolitan roadways. There are four convenient ways for motorists to receive traffic updates:* • Call 511 (English and Spanish). • Visit FL511.com. • Get the free “Florida 511” app. • Follow any of the 12 statewide, regional, or roadway-specific feeds on Twitter. *Use these resources before driving— or when pulled over in a safe place such as a rest area—not while operating a motor vehicle. 3 The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 11 OCCUPANT PROTECTION Seat Belts & Child Restraints Seat belts save lives, but only if worn correctly every time you are in a motor vehicle! You are far more likely to be killed in a crash if you are not wearing a seat belt. In a crash, your seat belt keeps you: • from being ejected from the vehicle; • from being thrown against other passengers, your steering wheel, or windshield; • behind the wheel, where you can control the vehicle. Wear both the lap belt and the shoulder belt. Wear your lap belt around your hips and wear your shoulder belt across your chest. Your seat belt will not work if it is tucked behind you. Airbags are not a substitute for seat belts! Florida law requires that all drivers, all front seat passengers, and all passengers under the age of 18 wear seat belts.* Children under age 4 must be in a safety seat, and children ages 4 and 5 must be in either a safety seat or a booster seat. Drivers will be charged with a seat belt violation if any passenger under the age of 18 is not restrained with a seat belt or child restraint device. Passengers 18 years old or older will be charged with the violation if they fail to wear a seat belt when required by law. In 2014, over 26,000 teen drivers in Florida received citations for seat belt violations. (Source: DHSMV.) Each passenger on a school bus equipped with safety belts or restraint systems shall wear a properly adjusted and fastened safety belt at all times while the bus is in operation. Florida law exempts the following from the seat belt requirements: • A person certified by a physician as having a medical condition that causes seat belt use to be inappropriate or dangerous. (Keep a copy of certification while driving/being driven.) • Employee of a newspaper home delivery service while delivering newspapers. • School buses purchased new prior to December 31, 2000. • Buses used for transportation of persons for compensation. • Farm equipment. • Trucks of a net weight of more than 26,000 pounds. • A seat belt (without booster seat) may only be used for children 4–5 years of age when the driver is not a member of the child’s immediate family and the child is being transported as a favor or in an emergency. It is the parent or guardian’s responsibility to supply the proper *Some exemptions apply to cars manufactured prior to 1968 and trucks prior to 1972. 12 ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles child restraint when transporting a child in a vehicle for hire (e.g., taxi, bus, limousine). The best child seat is one that fits your child, fits your car, and that you will use correctly every time. Read the car seat’s instruction manual and the portion of your vehicle’s owner manual on car seat installation. In passenger vehicles, children under 13 should be secured in the rear seat; airbags can injure or kill young children in the front seat. Never place a rear-facing car seat in front of an airbag. Leaving Children Unsupervised in Motor Vehicles Never leave a child unattended or unsupervised in a motor vehicle; it is extremely dangerous and can result in the child’s injury or death! Florida law states that a parent, legal guardian, or other person responsible for a child younger than 6 years of age must not leave the child unattended or unsupervised in a motor vehicle for a period in excess of 15 minutes or for any period of time if the motor of the vehicle is running, the health of the child is in danger, or the child appears to be in distress. A violation of this law is a second degree misdemeanor and can result in a fine of up to $500. Violations that cause great bodily harm, permanent disability, or permanent disfigurement to a child are considered a third degree felony. 4 Edge Lines Broken White Line Solid White Line Broken Yellow Line Double White Lines The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 13 TRAFFIC CONTROLS Pavement Markings Lines, symbols, and words are painted on roadways to help direct drivers and control traffic flow. You must know what the different lines, colors, and symbols mean and obey them. Unless you are turning, exiting a highway, or changing lanes, always stay between the lines marking your lane. Edge Lines Solid lines along the side of the road mark the edge of the pavement. • Single solid white line. Marks the right edge of the pavement. • Single solid yellow line. Marks the left edge of the pavement on divided highways and one-way streets. White Lane Lines White lane lines separate lanes of traffic moving in the same direction. • Single broken white line. You may cross this line to change lanes when it is safe to do so. • Single solid white line. You may travel in the same direction on both sides of this line, but do not cross the line unless you must do so to avoid a hazard. Also used to discourage lane changes near intersections. • Double solid white lines. Crossing a double solid line is not allowed. Yellow Lane Lines Yellow lane lines separate lanes of traffic moving in opposite directions. • Single broken yellow line. Stay to the right of the line. You may temporarily cross this line when you are passing a vehicle in front of you. • Double solid yellow lines. Vehicles moving in either direction must not cross these lines (unless turning left when it is safe to do so). Double Yellow Lines Double Yellow Lines (limited passing) Turn Lanes Center Turn Lane Reversable Lane Bike Lane 14 ©2015 Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles • Double yellow lines–solid on right, broken on left. Passing or crossing is not allowed in this lane except when turning left. • Double yellow lines–broken on right, solid on left. Passing is permitted in this lane when safe to do so. Turn Lanes Arrows are often used with white lane lines to show which turn may be made from the lane. • Lane is marked with a curved arrow and the word “ONLY”: you must turn in the direction of the arrow. • Lane is marked with both a curved and straight arrow: you may either turn or go straight. • Two-way roadway with center lane: drivers from either direction may use the center lane for left turns; you must not use for passing. Reversible Lanes Some highways have reversible traffic lanes to help handle rush-hour traffic. The direction of traffic is normally reversed at set times each day. These lanes are marked with special pavement markings, lane signals, and signs. Bicycle Lanes Some roads have pavement markings that show lanes specifically designated for the exclusive use of bicycles or for shared use. • Exclusive bike lane. Solid white lines separate these bike lanes from motor vehicle travel lanes. Often marked with bike lane signs/symbols. • Shared-use lane. Marked with “sharrows.” These markings alert motorists that bicyclists may use the entire lane, indicate to bicyclists where to ride, and discourage bicycling in the wrong direction. White Stop Lines Stop lines show where you must stop for a stop sign or red light. You must stop your vehicle before any part of it crosses the line before the crosswalk. Sharrow Stop Line & Crosswalk The Official Florida Driver License Handbook—rev. 101615 15 .......................................................................................................................

The Official Florida Driver License Handbook is produced by the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV). This guide has the information you need to prepare for the Florida Driver License Class E knowledge and skills exams and to help you drive safely and lawfully.

About edocr

I am an accomplished content marketing professional helping you to build your brand and business. In my current role, I fulfill a multi-faceted solution marketplace including: publishing and sharing your content, embedding a document viewer on your website, improving your content’s search engine optimization, generating leads with gated content and earning money by selling your documents. I gobble up documents, storing them for safekeeping and releasing the text for excellent search engine optimization, lead generation and earned income. 

Publishing documents on edocr.com is a proven way to start demand generation for your products and services. Thousands of professionals and businesses publish marketing, sales, operations, customer service and financial documents making it easier for prospects and customers to find content, helping them to make informed decisions.

Get publishing now!

×

Modal Header

Modal body